Tag Archives: Curt Cacioppo

A Dream of Waking on Now Is the Time

beckerfadeMusic of memories sleeping and waking inhabit Now Is the Time on WRTI this Saturday, December 10th at 9 pm. A sparkling duo for violin and piano is A Dream of Waking by Dan Becker, and Elizabeth Brown walks us through the mnemonic device of remembrance in The Memory Palace for a trio of flute, cello, and piano. Brown is the flutist, also. Curt Cacioppo takes us through his own memories of Italy in his string quartet Divertimenti in Italia.

The sliding jazz of Adam Berenson’s Prose Surrealism leads us into the Wordsworth-inspired Evening Voluntaries of William Kraft for French horn, and then Dan Becker closes the program with a re-imagining of Bach in ReInvention 3F.

PROGRAM:
Dan Becker: A Dream of Waking
Elizabeth Brown: The Memory Palace
Curt Cacioppo: Divertimenti in Italia (String Quartet No. 6)
Adam Berenson: Prose Surrealism
William Kraft: Evening Voluntaries
Dan Becker: ReInvention 3F

Every Saturday night at 9 Eastern, Kile Smith plays new American classical music on WRTI’s Now Is the Time, at wrti.org and on HD-2. At wrti.org click on the Listen: Classical button at the top of any page. Thanks for supporting American contemporary music on WRTI! 

Concert di Gaudí on Now Is the Time

GaudiCrypt

Crypt of the unfinished chapel of Antoni Gaudí in the Colònia Güell in Santa Coloma de Cervelló (Catalonia). Creative Commons ShareAlike, Till F. Teenck

We look up and out on Now Is the Time, Saturday, September 26th at 9 pm. In Philadelphia there’s no escaping the influence of the pope’s visit this weekend, so there’s a sacred tinge to this Saturday’s program. Curt Cacioppo gives the solo piano a workout, negotiating the potential of a rock-ribbed hymn in his Ostinato-Fantasia on “All Creatures of Our God and King.”

As an interpolation before the longest piece tonight, a string quartet takes on—and swings—the Chick Corea tune Spain. Christopher Rouse then anoints the Spanish ancestry of the guitar with the transcendence of Antoni Gaudí, called “God’s Architect,” in his guitar concerto for Sharon Isbin, Concert di Gaudí. A work in the form of a Handel coronation anthem closes our program, Carson Cooman’s O Lord, I Will Sing of Your Love Forever.

from Chick Corea: Spain (arr. Cohen): 

PROGRAM:
Curt Cacioppo: Ostinato-Fantasia on “All Creatures of Our God and King”
Chick Corea: Spain
Christopher Rouse: Concert di Gaudí
Carson Cooman: O Lord, I Will Sing of Your Love Forever

Every Saturday night at 9 Eastern, Kile Smith hosts Now Is the Time, new American classical music on WRTI’s all-classical stream. At wrti.org click on the Listen: Classical button at the top of any page. Thanks for supporting American contemporary music on WRTI! 

Women at the Cross on Now Is the Time

PrimoschSacredSongsTwo Philadelphia composers explore sacred themes on Now Is the Time, Saturday, April 4th at 9 pmHoly the Firm is the song cycle by James Primosch on texts by Denise Levertov, Annie Dillard, Susan Stewart, and the 7th-century John Climacus, whose monastic treatise The Ladder of Divine Ascent takes its inspiration from the angels in Jacob’s dream. From the Sacred Songs CD, this is magical and colorful writing for soprano and small orchestra.

Curt Cacioppo’s Women at the Cross, from his recent CD Ritornello, is a suite for string quartet and piano focused on the week of the Passion of Christ. The movements are Maria gratia plena (Mary, full of grace), Procula, Veronica, Maddalena, La terza Maria, Salome, and Sons of Thunder; the finale refers to James and John, called “Boanerges” or “Sons of Thunder” by Jesus, and thought to be the sons of one of the women disciples, Salome.

from Curt Cacioppo: Women at the Cross 

PROGRAM:
James Primosch: Holy the Firm
Curt Cacioppo: Women at the Cross

Every Saturday night at 9 Eastern, Kile Smith hosts Now Is the Time, all styles of contemporary concert music by living American composers on WRTI’s all-classical stream. Just go to wrti.org and click on the Listen: Classical button at the top of any page. In the Philadelphia area with an HD radio? Dial us up at 90.1 FM-HD2, or find all the frequencies here, from the Jersey Shore to the Poconos to Harrisburg to Delaware. Thanks for supporting American contemporary music on WRTI! 

Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. on Now Is the Time

MLKJr300We reflect on a legacy of greatness on Now Is the Time, Saturday, January 18th at 9 pm Eastern on the all-classical stream at wrti.org and WRTI-HD2. Yehudi Menuhin said this: “I look to music to bind and heal. I think the musician can be a trusted object, offering his fellow men solace, but also a reminder of human excellence. I believe as strongly as ever that our finite world turns on finite individual efforts to embody an ideal.”

Steven Gerber’s Spirituals for strings and Curt Cacioppo’s Contrapuntal Fantasy on John Newton’s “Amazing Grace” for piano spin the teardrop crystals of an American heritage in the sunlight of varied compositional languages. Leslie Adams sets African-American poets, including Langston Hughes, in Nightsongs. And in Stèle for solo violin, Karel Husa pays tribute to Menuhin, whose greatness went beyond music. Each of these works points us to ideals beyond our finite selves, something Martin Luther King, Jr. reminds us of whenever we remember his legacy.

from Steven R. Gerber: “Goin’ Home” from Spirituals 

PROGRAM:
Steven R. Gerber: Spirituals
Curt Cacioppo: Contrapuntal Fantasy on John Newton’s “Amazing Grace”
H. Leslie Adams: Nightsongs, excerpts
Karel Husa: Stèle

Every Saturday night at 9 Eastern, Kile Smith brings you Now Is the Time, all styles of contemporary concert music by living American composers on WRTI’s all-classical stream (just go to wrti.org and click on the Listen: Classical button at the top of any page). Here are the recording details and complete schedule. In the Philadelphia area with an HD radio? Dial us up at 90.1 FM-HD2, or find all the frequencies here, depending on where you are, from the Shore to the Poconos to Harrisburg to Dover. Thanks for supporting American contemporary music on WRTI!

In Bone-Colored Light on Now Is the Time

BoneColoredLight480Stark contrasts play against each other on Now Is the Time, Sunday, August 11th at 10 pm. Zeitgeist performs In Bone-Colored Light, Jerome Kitzke’s illumination of a late afternoon in an American landscape. Gabriela Lena Frank opens up the Indian and Spanish cultures of Peru for “Holy Mary, let’s go dance,” or Ccollanan Maria, a sighing, gospel-inflected work sung by San Francisco’s Volti.

Maggi Payne finds music in sounds from the environment, processes them electronically, and attractive surprises result in System Test (Fire and Ice). And from Curt Cacioppo’s recent CD Italia, Network for New Music performs Colomba Scarlatta della Libia, or Red Dove of Libya, a bubbling work of shadow and light.

from Jerome Kitzke: In Bone-Colored Light 

PROGRAM:
Jerome Kitzke: In Bone-Colored Light
Gabriela Lena Frank: Ccollanan Maria
Maggi Payne: System Test (Fire and Ice)
Curt Cacioppo: Red Dove of Libya

Every Sunday night at 10, Kile Smith brings you Now Is the Time, all styles of contemporary concert music by living American composers on WRTI-HD2 and the all-classical stream at wrti.org. Here are the recording details and complete schedule.

Coyoteway

CoyoteWe embrace ceremonies of healing on Now is the Time, Sunday, January 13th at 10 pmCoyoteway is from a cycle of string quartets Curt Cacioppo has written on the Navajo creation story. Wreathed in smoke, and amid singing and dancing, the person seeks forgiveness through apology for past wrongs, and is healed.

David Maslanka composed Concerto for Trombone and Wind Ensemble as a tribute to a friend, flutist Christine Nield Capote, who was also a colleague to the soloist in this work, trombonist Tim Conner, and the conductor Gary Green. Its three movements are Requiem; Beloved; Be Content, Be Calm.

from David Maslanka: Concerto for Trombone and Wind Ensemble 

PROGRAM:

David Maslanka: Concerto for Trombone and Wind Ensemble
Curt Cacioppo: Coyoteway

Every Sunday night at 10, Kile Smith brings you Now is the Time, all styles of contemporary concert music by living American composers on WRTI-HD2 and the all-classical stream at wrti.org. Here are the recording details and complete schedule.

Lyric Fest, On Zacheus

What a program Sunday afternoon! Lyric Fest’s “Old City—New Song II” at The Academy of Vocal Arts was a straight-up no-foolin’ art song recital, a heliotrope bouquet of tunes brand-new, kind of new, and new. They were all 20th- and 21st-century songs, and all the composers were connected to Philadelphia in some way.

The oldest were Menotti, Weisgall, and Bernstein. No, I’m wrong, Blitzstein slipped in (b.1905), one of the great surprises of the day, with “Sweet is the Rose.” Daron Hagen may be pleased to know that he followed Blitzstein, one of his influences. Daron’s “Echo’s Song” was gorgeous, his handling of “Our beauties are not ours” making my heart stop for a second. What a feel for line he has, he always has.

Sheridan Seyfried (b.1984) was the youngest, his “Love Song” a delight. Michael Djupstrom is not much older, and his “Spring Rain,” one of a few Sara Teasdale poems on the concert, had a confident pace and trust in the music doing its work.

Lee Hoiby’s “Goodbye, Goodbye World” was a heart-rending take on Thornton Wilder’s Our Town soliloquy. Lee died just last year. I was honored to have visited him at his upstate New York home a few times. He is a greatly undersold composer, but singers know and adore him. Ah, can he write a song.

Barber, Rorem, Persichetti, Schickele (as PDQ Bach), Danielpour, and Rochberg were represented well, and excuse my running past their deservedly known names. Benjamin C.S. Boyle, Curt Cacioppo, Andrea Clearfield, and James Primosch entranced the audience. Boyle and Clearfield had dramatic sweep and grandeur; Cacioppo’s “In Memoriam” was boiled down, inward pain, whispered. “Cinder” of Primosch masterfully balanced opposites. His orchestral canvasses are songs; it is only right that “Cinder,” well, it is a symphony.

Big premieres from Thomas Lloyd (“Ben Unleashed” humorously setting Ben Franklin aphorisms for the ensemble) and Allen Krantz (“From On the Road,” an energetic Jack Kerouac encomium) upped the ante on the afternoon.

Along with the Blitzstein, the other surprises were George Crumb’s early “Let it be forgotten,” stunning, and two ravishing songs by Romeo Cascarino. I know his music and perhaps shouldn’t have been surprised, but “The Shrine” and “Altar Candle” hold up to anything.

A very early song of mine, “On Zacheus,” from my Three Songs, No. 3, was sung with a passion that any composer craves. Soprano Kelly Ann Bixby sang this a couple of months ago, and went even further into it now. Is it the decades removed from the composing of it, or am I confessing something I shouldn’t by admitting that I was taken aback by the emotions in this Francis Quarles poem? It’s early (did I say that?) and, as I told a friend at the concert, “utterly naïve,” but I like it more now than ever. Quarles, the metaphysical poet from the time of John Donne and George Herbert, is always apt, succinct, and two steps ahead of you.

Kelly was one of the delicious singers on the program, along with mezzo Suzanne DuPlantis, soprano Randi Marrazzo (both co-founders of Lyric Fest, along with the redoubtable accompanist Laura Ward), tenor Thomas Lloyd (I had never heard the conductor sing before!), and baritone Jarrett Ott. Bless them all. They’ve blessed us: Lyric Fest has been kicking it for ten years now.